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Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Washington's Power Duo Take To the Road Promoting Quality Education

President Obama and First Lady Michelle spent this week speaking about the importance of a good education.
 
From revamping Head Start programs for kids just starting out, to mentoring college bound students as they begin their college journey, Washington's White House power duo continues to heavily promote education for America's next generations.


Washington, D.C., area high school students get first hand advice about college from First Lady Michelle Obama.

The First Lady, speaking at a Georgetown University college mentoring event, told a group of high school students she believes in them, and that they should believe in themselves too.

"Everyone here who is hosting you today, they’re here for one simple reason, and it’s important for you all to know:  We’re here because we all believe that all of you belong at colleges and universities just like this one.  And that’s one of the reasons why we want you to spend time on these campuses.  We believe that all of you have exactly what it takes to continue your education after high school, and to succeed in any career or any endeavor that you choose.  And we really want you to believe that as well.  I want you to believe that.  That’s why we do this not just all across the country, but we have done mentor ship sessions like this all over the world."

The students participated in a Q&A session with the First Lady she answered questions the students had about college life.

One student asked the First Lady what her strengths and weakness were when she attended law school.

On her strengths, the First Lady answered, "I think one of my strengths was that I had a big mouth and I liked to talk a lot.  That’s why mother said I should go to law school.  It’s like, “You like to talk, just go.”

The First Lady revealed one her weaknesses was gearing up for courses she wasn't particularly excited about.

"You don’t really get to choose any courses on your own, so you’re trying a little bit of everything.  Well, I like criminal law.  I love contracts.  Sometimes civil procedure wasn’t as interesting because it’s about the rules of law.  So I had to find a way to stay pumped up and engaged even in courses that weren’t my choosing." 

Offering advice to the students who may be faced with the same issue during their own college journey, the First Lady added, "So you got to be able to get over the hump of doing well in things that you’re not necessarily good at or not particularly interested in."

President Obama, speaking at the Yeadon Regional Head Start Center in Philadelphia announced his plan to hold Head Start programs more accountable.




"We know that three and four year-olds who go to quality preschool are less likely to repeat a grade, are less likely to need special education, are more likely to graduate from high school, the president said.  "This makes early education one of our best investments.”


The president said again he would move forward with or without the help of Congress who he referred to as a Congress that stands for "dysfunction and delay".

Congress has argued to cut Head Start programs, and Pell Grants for college students.

"We can’t wait to give our youngest children the same basic opportunities we give all children", the president said, telling attendees he's on their side when it comes to making sure young kids start out receiving a quality education.

Said Obama, "You've got a president who’s got your back."

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